About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
in aid to farmers. this is in addition to the destruction caused by hurricane sandy, the largest hurricane ever to form in the atlantic basin. it's estimated that sandy will cost almost $80 billion in federal funding for the replacement of homes, infrastructure, and buildings. combined, the drought and sandy will cost the federal government tens of billions of dollars at a time when we're talking about our debt. it's the job of congress and the administration to help these americans in time of need, make no mistake about it. we should. we will. but we need to be honest about how we plan for disaster spending. according to a report by the g.a.o. in september, there have been over 540 disaster declarations in the last eight years requiring over $90 billion in federal aid. it's time we face facts and state the obvious -- weather is getting worse. extreme weather events are happening with increased frequency and intensity. i held a hearing last year to talk about this issue, to examine whether the federal government is really prepared for this. the answer is no. i didn't bring in the
in infrastructure, which we desperately need after hurricane -- or we call it super storm sandy that hit new york, that hit new jersey, that hit connecticut, that hit delaware, that hit maryland. we now see that our infrastructure has to be what we call hardened, made stronger. we can do that if we invest in our people. so, madam president, the president has offered a very clear plan that takes us off the fiscal cliff that is fair. we have 27 days to do the right thing. the senate already passed the tax cuts for 98% of the people. all we're asking is for the house to do that, match us. then we can get back to the table and figure out a way to soften the blow of the automatic spending cuts. we could look at tax reform. and i want to just say this about tack reform. when our colleagues complain about tax rates and say well, we would rather close loopholes, watch out. in order to raise the kind of funds we need to raise to lower this deficit, you're looking at the two biggest --quote, unquote -- deductions. one is for your mortgage and one is for charitable, and i would ask rhetorically what billion
a very important and passionate argument about the effects of hurricane sandy. in pennsylvania we had significant damage, but exclusively almost entirely from wind damage. millions lost power, but the damage was incomparable to the damage compounded by the water damage done along the shore. i'm looking forward to see the supplemental well-crafted and i hope properly outside because we also have a fiscal crisis of enormous magnitude. necessary spending to address emergencies is very real. it's really important at the outset. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i would like to thank secretary donovan for his testimony and for being here with us today. the financial stability of the fha is an issue the committee does not take lightly and we will continue this dialogue to take action where necessary to protect taxpayers. we appreciate your testimony, mr. secretary. this hearing is adjourned. >> thank you, mr. chairman. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> the supreme court will look at what was passed
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3